Citation Guide

How to cite a radio/TV program in a bibliography using APA

The citation format for a radio/TV program depends on the type of program.

EPISODE OF PROGRAM: Last Name, F. (Writer), & Last Name, F. (Director). (Year Broadcast). Episode [Program Type series episode]. In F. Last Name (Producer), Program. Network City: Network.

ENTIRE SERIES: Last Name, F. (Producer). (Year Broadcast). Series [Program Type series]. Network City: Network.

INDIVIDUAL BROADCAST: Last Name, F. (Producer). (Date Broadcast). Program [Program Type broadcast]. Network City: Network.

Start the citation by listing personnel relevant to the program you are citing. The personnel names should be reversed, with the last name coming first, followed by a comma. First names and any middle names are given as initials, each followed by a period. A suffix, such as a roman numeral or Jr./Sr. should appear after the person's first and middle initials, preceded by a comma. Place the personnel's title in parentheses directly after their name, and place any necessary punctuation after the parentheses.

For a program with two or more personnel, separate them by comma, and use an ampersand before the last person's name. If more than six personnel are cited, abbreviate the seventh person and any others that follow with "et al."

If you are citing a specific episode of a regular program, cite the writer and director at the beginning of the citation (as outlined above). Place the episode's original year of broadcast in parentheses, and a period after the parentheses. List the episode name and/or number and afterwards, in square brackets, indicate whether it was a "Radio" or "Television" broadcast, followed by the text "series episode". Then place a period after the brackets. Place the text "In", followed by the producer's first, and if given, middle initials, and last name. Follow their name with "Producer" in parentheses and a comma after the parentheses. Italicize the program's name and follow it with a period. Complete the citation with the city in which the broadcasting network is located, a colon, the network, and a period.

Mehlman, P. (Writer), & Ackerman, A. (Director). (1995). The highlights of 100 [Television series episode]. In L. David (Producer), Seinfeld. New York: NBC.

If you are citing an entire series, cite the producer at the beginning of the citation (as outlined above). Place the series's first year of broadcast in parentheses, and a period after the parentheses. Italicize the program's name and afterwards, in square brackets, indicate whether it was a "Radio" or "Television" series, followed by the text "series". Place a period outside of the brackets. Complete the citation with the city in which the broadcasting network is located, a colon, the network, and a period.

David, L. (Producer). (1989). Seinfeld [Television series]. New York: NBC.

If you are citing a specific program broadcast, cite the producer at the beginning of the citation (as outlined above). Place the episode's original date of broadcast in parentheses, with the year listed first, followed by a comma, and then the month and day. Place a period outside of the parentheses. Italicize the program's name and afterwards, in square brackets, indicate whether it was a "Radio" or "Television" program, followed by the text "broadcast". Place a period outside of the brackets. Complete the citation with the city in which the broadcasting network is located, a colon, the network, and a period.

Smith, J. (Producer). (2009, February 8). 51st Grammy Awards [Television broadcast]. New York: CBS.

Why Should I Cite?

You become an ethical writer.
Authors and artists get credit for their work.
It's good karma!
Using other people's research or ideas without giving credit is plagiarism. BibMe makes it easy to create citations, build bibliographies and acknowledge other people's work, so there's no excuse to plagiarize. Don't be a thief—save your grade, use BibMe and give credit to those who deserve it!