Citation Guide

How to cite a radio/TV program in a bibliography using MLA

The most basic citation for a radio/TV program consists of the episode title, program/series name, broadcasting network, the original broadcast date, and the medium.

"Episode Title." Program/Series Name. Network. Original Broadcast Date. Medium.

"The Highlights of 100." Seinfeld. Fox. 17 Feb. 2009. Television.

Begin the citation with the episode name or number, along with a period, inside quotation marks. Follow it with the name of the program or series, which is italicized, followed by a period. Also include the name of the network on which the program was broadcast, followed by a period. If the program was broadcast on a local affiliate of a national network, include the call letters and city of the local station, separated by a comma, after the name of the network. Follow the city with a period.

"The Highlights of 100." Seinfeld. Fox. WNYW, New York City. 17 Feb. 2009. Television.

State the date on which your program was originally broadcast, along with a period. The complete date should be written in the international format (e.g. "day month year"). With the exception of May, June, and July, month names should be abbreviated (four letters for September, three letters for all other months) and followed with a period. End the citation with the medium in which your program was broadcast (e.g. Television, Radio) and a period.

If relevant, you may also choose to include the names of personnel involved with the program. Depending on if the personnel are relevant to the specific episode or the series as a whole, place the personnel names either after the episode title or the program/series name. You may cite narrator(s) (preceded by the abbreviation "Narr."), writer(s) (preceded by the abbreviation "Writ."), director (preceded by the abbreviation "Dir."), performer(s) (preceded by the abbreviation "Perf."), and/or producer(s) (preceded by the abbreviation "Prod."). Group different types of personnel together and separate each personnel group by a period. Write these personnel names in normal order - do not list reverse the first and last names.

"The Highlights of 100." Narr. Jerry Seinfeld. Writ. Peter Mehlman. Dir. Andy Ackerman. Perf. Jerry Seinfeld, Jason Alexander, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, and Michael Richards. Prod. Larry David. Seinfeld. Fox. WNYW, New York City. 17 Feb. 2009. Television.

If you need to cite just a program/series, begin the citation with the program/series name, followed by the relevant personnel. For a series, cite the first year of airing in place of a specific broadcast date.

Seinfeld. Prod. Larry David. Fox. WNYW, New York City. 1989. Television.

Breaking the Magicians' Code: Magic's Biggest Secrets Finally Revealed. Narr. Mitch Pileggi. Fox. WNYW, New York City. 24 Nov. 1997. Television.

If you are citing a transcript of the program, the medium within the citation should be the medium in which the transcript was published (e.g. Print, Web), not the medium in which the program was broadcast. End the citation with the word "Transcript" and a period.

"The Highlights of 100." Seinfeld. Fox. WNYW, New York City. 17 Feb. 2009. Print. Transcript.

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