How to Write a Research Paper and Research Paper Topics

Are you unsure of how to write a great paper, thesis, or dissertation? If so, just take a deep breath and get ready to expand your writing skills. In this article, you will learn how to write a research paper that your teacher enjoys reading. Once you’re done with this article, you can also learn more here.

Now, let’s review the seven steps of creating a top-level written work.

First, Consider Your Research Paper Topics

Before you start writing, you should understand which research paper topics you can write about. You’ll also need to know the paper requirements.

If you don’t know this information, you have two options:

  1. Review your assignment sheet.
  2. Ask your teacher to clarify the requirements.

After you know the requirements, begin narrowing down your research paper topics. Do this by focusing on a specific aspect of the subject that’s not too broad or too narrow.

Also, make sure you take interest in the topic. After all, you’ll put hours of work into completing this paper. Easy research paper topics usually have enough source materials to reference without being overwhelming.

Here are some example research paper topics with evaluations of whether each subject is too broad or too narrow:

  • Far too broad: Sports.
  • Slightly less broad: Basketball.
  • Focused: Who is the best basketball player of our generation?
  • Too Narrow: High school basketball court requirements.

Check with your teacher to make sure your topic meets all the paper requirements before moving forward.

Second, Source Quality Information for Your Research Paper

There are many places to find quality information for your paper. Here are the top sources of information you should focus on:

  • Print material you can find in the library. For instance, encyclopedias, government reports, newspapers, and books.
  • Online materials from credible sources, especially from .gov, or .edu sites. Also, online periodicals you have evaluated.
  • Scholarly databases that organize academic publications. For example, EBSCO and LexisNexis.

While you’re at it, make sure that you’re keeping track of all the sources for your paper. You’ll use these to cite your work using MLA format or APA format.

Looking for help on other grammar topics? Take a peek at our grammar pages: Pronoun and Adverb.

Third, Select the Central Idea for Your Research Paper

Next, you need a thesis for your paper. This is the central idea you’re basing your writing around. Each paragraph of your paper will support the central idea and your position on the thesis topic.

Fourth, Create a Research Paper Outline

By outlining, you give your paper a logical structure that’s easy to follow. Therefore, you should identify the most important parts of your paper and arrange them into main points and sub-points.

Fifth, Draft Your Research Paper

After creating an outline, you can begin the writing process. Don’t worry if it’s not perfect right from the beginning. You have time to go through the editing process later. For now, just get your ideas out and ensure that you follow your outline.

Sixth, Rearrange Your Research Paper Outline and Complete a Second Draft

Once your first draft is complete, it’s time for a second draft. Get a friend to double check your writing and outline for any mistakes or use an online tool like the BibMe Plus grammar checker. It’ll review every noun, verb, adjective, and more, looking for general grammatical errors. It’s always great to have a second pair of eyes on your work to spot common errors that may have been missed.

Finally, Use the Correct Formatting Style

Now that you’re happy with your paper, it’s time to cite your work and follow the correct formatting style. In addition to MLA format and APA format, there are more styles of formatting work that your teacher may require you to follow. Either way, after formatting, you’re ready to hand in the paper to your teacher!

Do you still have questions on how to write a research paper? Use this link to find more info about the process.

Looking for further help and clarification on grammar topics? Check out our preposition, conjunction, interjection, and determiner pages.