Citation Guide

How to cite a lecture in a bibliography using MLA

The most basic entry for a lecture consists of the speaker name, presentation title, meeting/event, venue, city, date conducted, and lecture type.

Last Name, First Name. "Presentation Title." Meeting/Event. Venue, City. Date Conducted. Lecture Type.

Pausch, Randy. "Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams." Journeys. McConomy Auditorium, Pittsburgh. 18 Sept. 2007. Lecture.

Begin the citation with the name of the speaker. This person's name should be reversed, with a comma being placed after the last name and a period after the first name (or any middle name). A suffix, such as a roman numeral or Jr./Sr. should appear after the person's given name, preceded by a comma.

If the lecture has a title, place it, along with a period, in quotation marks, after the speaker's name. Afterwards, include the event or meeting name at which the lecture was conducted, followed by a period. If there is an institution that sponsored the lecture, include it after event name, followed by a period.

Pausch, Randy. "Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams." Journeys. Carnegie Mellon University. McConomy Auditorium, Pittsburgh. 18 Sept. 2007. Lecture.

Continue your citation with the location/venue name and the city in which it occured, separated by a comma. Place a period after the city. State the date on which the lecture was conducted, followed by a period. The complete date should be written in the international format (e.g. "day month year"). With the exception of May, June, and July, month names should be abbreviated (four letters for September, three letters for all other months) and followed with a period.

End the citation with the lecture type (e.g. Reading, Lecture, Address, Keynote Speech/Speech) and a period.

If the lecture is a class lecture, the event name should be the class/course name, and the sponsoring organization should be the school/university at which the lecture occurred.

Pausch, Randy. "Character interactions." Building Virtual Worlds. Carnegie Mellon University. Entertainment Technology Center, Pittsburgh. 25 Feb. 2005. Lecture.

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