Citation Guide

How to cite a newspaper in a bibliography using MLA

The most basic entry for a newspaper consists of the author name(s), article title, newspaper name, publication date, page numbers, and medium. Volume and issue numbers are to be omitted from newspaper citations in MLA.

Last Name, First Name. "Article Title." Newspaper Name Publication Date: Page Numbers. Medium.

Smith, John. "Steelers win Super Bowl XLIII." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 2 Feb. 2009: 4-6. Print.

The first author's name should be reversed, with a comma being placed after the last name and a period after the first name (or any middle name). The name should not be abbreviated and should be written exactly as it appears in the newspaper. Titles and affiliations associated with the author should generally be omitted. A suffix, such as a roman numeral or Jr./Sr. should appear after the author's given name, preceded by a comma.

For an article written by two or more authors, list them in order as they appear in the newspaper. Only the first author's name should be reversed, while the others are written in normal order. Separate author names by a comma, and place the word "and" before the last author's name. For articles with three or more authors, you may either include each author in the citation or only include the first author, followed by the abbreviation "et al."

Smith, John, Jane Doe, and Bob Anderson. "Steelers win Super Bowl XLIII." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 2 Feb. 2009: 4-6. Print.

Smith, John, et al. "Steelers win Super Bowl XLIII." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 2 Feb. 2009: 4-6. Print.

The full article title should be placed within quotations. Unless there is puncutation that ends the article title, place a period after the title within the quotations. Next, state the name of the magazine, which is italicized. Do not place any punctuation after the magazine name. Omit any introductory articles (e.g. A, An, The) from the newspaper name and do not place any punctuation after the newspaper name. If the publication city is not present in the newspaper name, place the city, without italics, in square brackets after the newspaper name (unless the newspaper is a well-known national newspaper).

Smith, John."Steelers win Super Bowl XLIII." Star-Ledger [Newark] 2 Feb. 2009: 4-6. Print.

The complete date of the newspaper article should be written in the international format (e.g. "day month year") and followed with a colon. With the exception of May, June, and July, month names should be abbreviated (four letters for September, three letters for all other months) and followed with a period. Include the page numbers on which the article appears, along with a period. Include the page numbers on which the article appears, along with a period. Cite all inclusive page numbers - if the article spans pages that are not consecutive, cite only the first page, followed by a plus sign.

Smith, John. "Steelers win Super Bowl XLIII." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 2 Feb. 2009: 16+. Print.

If no page numbers are available, include the abbreviation "n. pag." in place of page numbers.

Smith, John. "Steelers win Super Bowl XLIII." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 2 Feb. 2009: n. pag. Print.

Next cite the medium in which the article was published (e.g. Print, Web). If the medium is "Print", it should end the citation, along with a period. If the medium is "Web", also include the website name and the date on which you accessed the article online. The website name should be italicized and placed before the medium, along with a period. The accessed date should follow the medium (and be formatted using the international format of "day month year" as specified above), along with a period. For an article found in a database, cite it the same way you would an article published online: cite the medium as "Web" and place the database name in the same location as the website name.

Smith, John."Steelers win Super Bowl XLIII." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 2 Feb. 2009: 4-6. Post-Gazette NOW. Web. 21 Feb. 2009.

Smith, John. "Steelers win Super Bowl XLIII." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 2 Feb. 2009: 4-6. LexisNexis. Web. 21 Feb. 2009.

If the article was published online, you may choose to include the web address of the page, but only when the reader needs the URL to access the page or otherwise required by your professor. Although MLA guidelines previously recommended including URLs in a bibliography entry, that is no longer the case. In general, URLs are subject to change and can become outdated, refer to a session in use, and be very long. Users are more likely to find an article now by searching titles or author names. If you choose to include a URL, place it after the date of access (and its subsequent period) by enclosing it in angle brackets. Place a period after the angle brackets.

Smith, John. "Steelers win Super Bowl XLIII." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 2 Feb. 2009: 4-6. Post-Gazette NOW. Web. 21 Feb. 2009. <http://www.post-gazette.com/news/super_bowl_xliii.html>.

If an edition of the newspaper is listed on the masthead, place a comma after the publication, and include the edition and the abbreviation "ed." between the publication date and the colon that follows it.

Smith, John. "Steelers win Super Bowl XLIII." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 2 Feb. 2009, early ed.: 4-6. Print.

If the newspaper paginates each section separately, indicate the section the article was found in. If the section consists of a single letter, add the section letter to the beginning of the page numbers. Otherwise, separate the section name from the page numbers by placing a comma after the date (or edition, if available), including the abbreviation "sec." and then section name, and following it with a colon and the page number(s).

Smith, John, and Jane Doe. "Steelers win Super Bowl XLIII." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 2 Feb. 2009, early ed.: A4-6. Print.

Smith, John, and Jane Doe. "Steelers win Super Bowl XLIII." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 2 Feb. 2009, early ed., sec. Sports: 1+. Print.

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